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Under Consideration for August 2022

What We’re Reading—August

The following titles have been read and have received at least one yes vote for the final list.

Fiction and Poetry

Manywhere by Morgan Thomas

The nine stories in Morgan Thomas’s shimmering debut collection witness Southern queer and genderqueer characters determined to find themselves reflected in the annals of history, whatever the cost. As Thomas’s subjects trace deceit and violence through Southern tall tales and their own pasts, their journeys reveal the porous boundaries of body, land, and history, and the sometimes ruthless awakenings of self-discovery.

Our Colors by Gengoroh Tagame

A mesmerizing coming-of-age and coming-out graphic novel by the genius writer-artist of the Eisner Award–winning breakout hit My Brother’s Husband.

The Sign for Home by Blair Fell

When Arlo Dilly learns the girl he thought was lost forever might still be out there, he takes it as a sign and embarks on a life-changing journey to find his great love—and his freedom.

The Verifiers by Jane Pek

Introducing Claudia Lin: a sharp-witted amateur sleuth for the 21st century. This debut novel follows Claudia as she verifies people’s online lives, and lies, for a dating detective agency in New York City. Until a client with an unusual request goes missing. . . .

Young Mungo by Douglas Stuart

A story of queer love and working-class families, Young Mungo is the brilliant second novel from the Booker Prize-winning author of Shuggie Bain.

Nonfiction

Asylum by Edafe Okporo

A “moving…dramatic” (David Ebershoff, New York Times bestselling author of The Danish Girl), and urgent call to action for immigration justice by a Nigerian asylee and global gay rights and immigration activist Edafe Okporo.

Bi: Bisexual, Pansexual, Fluid, and Nonbinary Youth by Ritch C. Savin-Willams

Savin-Williams provides an important new understanding of bisexuality as an orientation, behavior, and identity. Bi shows us that bisexuality is seen and embraced as a valid sexual identity more than ever before, giving us timely and much-needed insight into the complex, fascinating experiences of bisexual youth themselves.

Miss Memory Lane by Colton Hayes

A brutally honest and moving memoir of lust, abuse, addiction, stardom, and redemption from Arrow and Teen Wolf actor Colton Haynes.

People Change by Vivek Shraya

The author of I’m Afraid of Men lets readers in on the secrets to a life of reinvention.

Phyllis Frye and the Fight for Transgender Rights by Michael G. Long, Shea Tuttle, Shannon Minter

This gripping account of Frye’s efforts to establish and protect the constitutional rights of transgender individuals not only fills a gap in existing histories of LGBTQ+ activism but will also inform and instruct contemporary trans activists

Queer Silence: On Disability and Rhetorical Absence by J. Logan Smilges

Championing the liberatory potential of silence to address the fraught disability politics of queerness.

Reclaiming Two-Spirits: Sexuality, Spiritual Renewal & Sovereignty in Native America by Gregory D. Smithers

A sweeping history of Indigenous traditions of gender, sexuality, and resistance that reveals how, despite centuries of colonialism, Two-Spirit people are reclaiming their place in Native nations.

Sex is as Sex Does: Governing Transgender Identity by Paisley Currah

What the evolving fight for transgender rights reveals about government power, regulations, and the law.

Ten Steps to Nanette by Hannah Gadsby

Multi-award-winning Hannah Gadsby broke comedy with her show Nanette when she declared that she was quitting stand-up. Now she takes us through the defining moments in her life that led to the creation of Nanette and her powerful decision to tell the truth—no matter the cost.

This Arab is Queer by Elias Jahshan

The ground-breaking anthology features the compelling and courageous memoirs of eighteen queer Arab writers—some internationally bestselling, others using pseudonyms. Here, we find heart-warming connections and moments of celebration alongside essays exploring the challenges of being LGBTQ+ and Arab.

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Under Consideration for July 2022

These books have at least one yes vote by the members of the committee.

Fiction and Poetry

Girl’s Guide to Leaving by Laura Villareal

Tumbleweeds and wandering cacti litter the page, coyotes croon at the prose. In poems haunted by specters of intimate partner violence, Girl’s Guide to Leaving considers what it means to escape the love that trapped you and find a temporary home in the barely cooled ashes of a wildfire.

Just by Looking at Him by Ryan O’Connell

From the star of Peacock’s Queer as Folk and the Netflix series Special comes a darkly witty and touching novel following a gay TV writer with cerebral palsy as he fights addiction and searches for acceptance in an overwhelmingly ableist world.

Our Colors by Gengoroh Tagame

A mesmerizing coming-of-age and coming-out graphic novel by the genius writer-artist of the Eisner Award–winning breakout hit My Brother’s Husband.

Young Mungo by Douglas Stuart

A story of queer love and working-class families, Young Mungo is the brilliant second novel from the Booker Prize-winning author of Shuggie Bain.

Nonfiction

Fine by Rhea Ewing

A vibrant and informative debut with “great documentary power” (Alison Bechdel), Fine is an elegantly illustrated celebration of the transgender community.

This Arab is Queer by Elias Jahshan

This ground-breaking anthology features the compelling and courageous memoirs of eighteen queer Arab writers—some internationally bestselling, others using pseudonyms. Here we find heart-warming connections and moments of celebration alongside essays exploring the challenges of being LGBTQ+ and Arab.

This Has Always Been A War by Lori Fox

A powerful, personal critique of capitalist patriarchy as seen through the eyes of a queer radical.

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Under Consideration June 2022

The following titles have been read and recommended for inclusion on the final list by at least one juror:

Fiction and Poetry

Chef’s Kiss by TJ Alexander

A high-strung pastry chef’s professional goals are interrupted by an unexpected career transition and the introduction of her wildly attractive nonbinary kitchen manager in this deliciously fresh and witty queer rom-com.

Eleutheria by Allegra Hyde

Allegra Hyde’s seductive first novel tackles the big stuff of climate change and the more intimate matter of heartbreak with grace. Indeed, Eleutheria bravely braids these together, the story of a lost soul moving through the world we’re rapidly losing.

Gods Children are Broken Little Things by Arinze Ifeakandu

A man revisits the university campus where he lost his first love, aware now of what he couldn’t understand then. A young musician rises to fame at the price of pieces of himself, and the man who loves him. Arinze Ifeakandu explores with tenderness and grace the fundamental question of the heart: can deep love and hope be sustained in spite of the dominant expectations of society, and great adversity.

My Volcano by John Elizabeth Stintzi

My Volcano is a kaleidoscopic portrait of a menagerie of characters, as they each undergo personal eruptions, while the Earth itself is constantly shifting. Parable, myth, science-fiction, eco-horror, My Volcano is a radical work of literary art, emerging as a subversive, intoxicating artistic statement by John Elizabeth Stintzi.

Sedating Elaine by Dawn Winter

An exuberant dark comedy about love, grief, sex, guilt, and one woman’s harebrained scheme to tranquilize her voraciously amorous girlfriend for a few days so that she might pay off her drug dealer, make soup, and finally get some peace and quiet.

Vagabonds! by Eloghosa Osunde

In the bustling streets and cloistered homes of Lagos, a cast of vivid characters—some haunted, some defiant—navigate danger, demons, and love in a quest to lead true lives.

Vera Kelly Lost and Found by Rosalie Knecht

Everyone’s favourite sleuth – Vera Kelly – is back and put to the test as she searches for her missing girlfriend.

Nonfiction

Knocking Myself Up: A Memoir of My (In)Fertility By Michelle Tea

From PEN/America Award winner, 2021 Guggenheim fellow, and beloved literary and tarot icon Michelle Tea, the hilarious, powerfully written, taboo-breaking story of her journey to pregnancy and motherhood as a 40 year-old, queer, uninsured woman.

Queer Conception: The Complete Fertility Guide for Queer and Trans Parents-To-Be By Kristin Liam Kali

The only evidence-based, up-to-date fertility guide for queer people from an experienced health care provider, this is also the first to be transgender inclusive and body-positive. 

Trailed: One Woman’s Quest to Solve the Shenandoah Murders By Kathryn Miles

 A riveting deep dive into the unsolved murder of two free-spirited young women in the wilderness, a journalists’ obsession—and a new theory of who might have done it.

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Considerations for May 2022

Fiction

Boys Come First by Aaron Foley

This hilarious, touching debut novel by Aaron Foley, author of How to Live in Detroit Without Being a Jackass, follows three Black gay millennial men looking for love, friendship, and professional success in the Motor City. 

The Con Artist by Luke Healy

Luke Healy’s playful, hilarious third graphic novel uses crisp lines and physical comedy to portray an uneasy friendship between two young men on the cusp of adulting. Snippets from Frank’s middling stand-up routines are punctuated by the subtle farce of Healy’s mise-en-scène and the lively, at times scathingly pointed, banter of old friends. The Con Artists is a stylish character study that asks the question of who fools who once everyone is off-camera.

Flung Out of Space by Grace Ellis and Hannah

A fictional and complex portrait of bestselling author Patricia Highsmith caught up in the longing that would inspire her queer classic, The Price of Salt.

Like a House on Fire by Lauren McGrayer

After twelve years of marriage and two kids, Merit has begun to feel like a stranger in her own life. She loves her husband and sons, but she desperately needs something more than sippy cups and monthly sex. So, she returns to her career at Jager + Brandt, where a brilliant and beautiful Danish architect named Jane decides to overlook the “break” in Merit’s résumé and give her a shot.

Love and Other Disasters by Anita Kelly

The first openly nonbinary contestant on America’s favourite cooking show falls for their clumsy competitor in this delicious romantic comedy debut!

Panpocalypse by Carley Moore

During the coronavirus pandemic, a queer disabled woman bikes through a locked-down NYC for the ex-girlfriend who broke her heart.

Siren & Muses by Antonia Angress

Four artists are drawn into a web of rivalry and desire at an elite art school and on the streets of New York in this magnificent debut for fans of Writers & Lovers and The Goldfinch.

Tripping Arcadia by Kit Mayquist

The perfect next read for fans of Mexican GothicTripping Arcadia is a page-turning and shocking tale with an unforgettable protagonist that explores family legacy and inheritance, the sacrifices we must make to get by in today’s world, and the intoxicating, dangerous power of wealth.

The Secret Life of Albert Entwistle by Matt Cain

Perfect for fans of Fredrik Backman and TJ Klune, this humorous, life-affirming, and charmingly wise novel tells the story of how the forced retirement of a shy, closeted postman in northern England creates a second chance with his lost love, as he learns to embrace his true self, connect with his community, and finally experience his life’s great adventure…

Nonfiction

In Sensorium: Notes for my People by Tanais

Structured like a perfume—moving from base to heart to head notes—In Sensorium interlaces eons of South Asian perfume history, erotic and religious texts, survivor testimonies, and material culture with memoir. In Sensorium is archive and art, illuminating the great crises of our time with the language of Liberation.

Ma and Me by Putsata Reang

In her startling memoir, Reang explores the long legacy of inherited trauma and the crushing weight of cultural and filial duty. With rare clarity and lyric wisdom, Ma and Me is a stunning, deeply moving memoir about love, debt, and duty.

This Has Always Been a War by Lori Fox

In essays that are both accessible and inspiring, Lori Fox examines their confrontations with the capitalist patriarchy through their experiences as a queer, non-binary, working-class farm hand, labourer, bartender, bush-worker, and road dog, exploring the ugly places where issues of gender, sexuality, class, and the environment intersect.

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Over the Rainbow Press Release: Top Ten of 2021

CHICAGO – The Over the Rainbow committee of ALA’s Rainbow Roundtable gave careful consideration to 332 books across all genres, including memoir, history, true crime, mystery, romance, fiction, poetry, and more. The final ten selections showcased a wide range of queer stories and experiences, working to dispel, one book at a time, the single narrative.  

The Top 10 selections in fiction and non-fiction were:

  • “Black Boy Out of Time: A Memoir” by Hari Ziyad; Published by Little A
  • “The Natural Mother of the Child” by Krys Malcolm Belc; Published by Counterpoint
  • “Belly of the Beast: The Politics of Anti-Fatness and Anti-Blackness” by Da’Shaun Harrison; Published by North Atlantic Books
  • “With Teeth” by Kristen Arnett; Published by Riverhead Books
  • “Milk Fed” by Melissa Broder; Published by Scribner
  • “One Last Stop” by Casey McQuiston; Published by St. Martin’s Griffin, and imprint of St. Martin’s Publishing Group
  • “Detransition Baby: A Novel” by Torrey Peters; Published by One World, an imprint of Random House, a division of Penguin Random House
  • “Stone Fruit” by Lee Lai; Published by Fantagraphics
  • “Sorrowland” by Rivers Solomon; Published by MCD
  • “Patience & Esther” by SW Searle; Published by Iron Circus Comics

“In a year which saw more book challenges than any other, largely concerning books with queer content, it was heartening to also see publishers continue to feature, promote, and elevate queer narratives across all genres.” The Over the Rainbow Committee noted. “Queer stories can be heartbreaking, exciting, romantic, incredible, challenging, unbearable, exquisite, silly, and anything else you can think of. These selections prove it.”

The charge of the Over the Rainbow Book List Committee is to promote the improved quality and accessibility of LGBTQIA+ literature through the creation of an annual annotated bibliography of books for general adult readership. Committee members select titles that exhibit commendable literary quality and significant, authentic LGBTQIA+ content and are recommended for adults over age 18. The Over the Rainbow Book List Committee (OTR) coordinates with other Rainbow Round Table committees to promote the improved quality and accessibility of LGBTQIA+ literature.

The Rainbow Round Table (RRT) – formerly known as the GLBTRT – of the American Library Association, is the oldest professional association for LGBTQIA+ people in the United States. It is committed to serving the information needs of the LGBTQIA+ professional library community and information and access needs of individuals at large. It is home to Rainbow Book Month, a nationwide celebration every June, and the Stonewall Book Award, the first award honoring LGBTQIA+ books. The Rainbow Round Table is committed to encouraging and supporting the free and necessary access to all information, as reflected by the missions of the American Library Association and democratic institutions. 

For Immediate Release
Tue, 02/15/2022

Contact:
Monica Chapman
Program Coordinator, Coretta Scott King Book Awards and ODLOS Round Tables
ALA-ODLOS
3122804297
mlchapman@ala.org

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Over the Rainbow Long List

The shortlist of titles considered for the Over the Rainbow final bibliography for books published in 2021 are the following:

Fiction and Poetry

And Then The Gray Heaven. R.E. Katz. Dzanc Books, 2021. B, expert museum diorama designer & artist, has had a freak accident at home and ends up in the hospital. Because Jules, their partner, is not any legally recognized form of “family”, they are not allowed in to see B. When B passes away, Jules is permitted to attend the funeral and the family is convinced to give Jules ⅔ of B’s ashes. But what to do with them? What follows is a quietly humorous look back at B’s and Jules’ lives before they met, interspersed with Jules’ journey to bury B…in all the museum exhibits they ever helped curate.

Black Girl, Call Home. Jasmine Mans. Berkley, (Penguin Random House), 2021. Jasmine Mans’ poetry is specific to a Black girl’s experience. From the different ways they do their hair to their complicated feelings about their parents. It is also an homage to Black mothers, to the way they imparted knowledge and wisdom through their actions, their worries, their triumphs, and their mistakes. Mixed in with movements on pop culture, women’s history, and writings about the gentle awe of falling in love with a woman, the poems of this collection are powerful, moving, and timely.

Detransition Baby: A Novel. Torrey Peters. One World (Penguin Randomhouse), 2021. Peters’ debut novel explores womanhood and relationships as it follows Reese, a trans woman longing to become a mother, who is approached by her de-transitioned ex to raise a child with his pregnant, cisgender boss and lover.

Dreaming of You: A Novel in Verse. Melissa Lozada-Oliva. Astra House. 2021. Lozada-Oliva has written something which defies explanation and will prompt many a conversation. The narrator, Melissa, manages to resurrect Selena Quintanilla, and then has to live with her. Part dream, part surrealist nightmare, part existential dread, entirely beautiful, this novel will make you ask yourself the questions you’ve been avoiding about authenticity, celebrity, obsession, and loss. 

A Master of Djinn. P. Djèlí Clark. Tordotcom, 2021. Egypt in 1912 is a world power, but it has some help from djinn, and all manner of fantastical creatures. Fatma el-Sha’arawi, a government agent who investigates mystical goings on (and saved the universe), is called to solve the murder of an entire secret society dedicated to a famous, and famously absent, mystic Al-Jahiz, who may or may not have returned. Clues abound, including references to the great djinn powers still locked away. Fatma must find the person claiming to be Al-Jahiz before they release the most powerful djinn in the universe. This steampunk alternate historical mystery is a wild ride.

Milk Fed. Melissa Broder. Scribner, 2021. Broder explores different types of hunger in this novel about Rachel, a 24-year old woman with a highly restricted diet, a fascination with the Orthodox Jewish woman running her frozen yogurt shop, and a therapist who encourages her to examine her relationships with others and with herself. 

One Last Stop. Casey McQuiston. St. Martin’s Griffin, 2021. August’s move to New York City is supposed to prove her right: that things like magic and cinematic love stories don’t exist. A few weird roommates and a job at a 24 hour pancake house shouldn’t change that. But then she sees Jane on the subway everyday.  Dazzling, charming, mysterious…her subway crush. Except Jane doesn’t just look like a 1970s punk rocker – she’s actually displaced in time from the 1970s and August will need to use every skill she has to help her.

Patience & Esther: An Edwardian Romance. SW Searles. Iron Circus Comics, 2021. A steamily romantic graphic novel about the love between Patience, a Scottish parlor maid, and Esther, an Indian-born ladies’ maid. Searles’ art portrays lovingly drawn characters of different body types and sizes, and highlights themes of class, race, and orientation in a realistic, yet hopeful, way.

Persephone Station. Stina Leicht. Gallery/Saga Press. 2021. Angel, an ex-soldier turned merc, just wants to get paid and fly under the radar.  She and her crew, a motley assortment of skills and personalities, take on assignments for which no one else has the guts. Under the surface, though, a timeless battle of wills rages for control of space itself. Stina Leicht has crafted an entertaining mercenary space opera that is as grand as it is expansive that puts women and nonbinary queer folk at the forefront.

Sorrowland. Rivers Solomon. Farrar, Strauss & Giroux. A novel about a mother trying hard to survive in a land of fiends. The novel shifts backwards and forwards through time, encompassing the lives of Vern, Howling, and Feral, and the people that circulate around them. Solomon belongs in the tradition of Toni Morrison and Jesmyn Ward.

Stone Fruit. Lee Lai. Fantagraphics, 2021. An emotionally honest graphic novel about three women navigating complex familial and romantic relationships while caring for a six-year-old girl. Lee Lai’s beautiful illustrations evoke the wildness of the liminal spaces where love, duty, and identity intersect.

Under the Whispering Door. T.J. Klune. Tor Books, 2021. Wallace Price is not ready to be dead, and is certainly not ready to move on to whatever mysterious “hereafter” he can expect. Hugo, a ferryman who guides souls to the afterlife, tells Wallace he can stay with him at his tea shop, Charon’s Crossing, until Wallace is ready to go. But as Wallace begins to realize all the beauty, compassion, and love he missed in his life, how will he prepare himself for death?

With Teeth. Kristen Arnett. Riverhead Books, 2021. Kristen Arnett’s dark irreverence and visceral storytelling bring to light the unspoken difficulties of queer relationships, motherhood, self-hood, and the limits of each. It will leave you deeply uncomfortable, as it deals with truths easily ignored and rarely dwelt in, with a main character who will frustrate you to no end, but you will recognize in an instant.

Nonfiction

Belly of the Beast: The Politics of Anti-Fatness as Anti-Blackness. Da’Shaun Harrison. North Atlantic Books, 2021. This title is in conversation with Sonya Renee Taylor’s The Body is Not An Apology, but instead looks through a wider lens explaining how anti-fatness is also anti-blackness, using modern examples and drawing from others’ work. An excellent read for understanding anti-fatness as anti-blackness and for beginning to imagine what a more just and loving world could look like.

Black Boy Out of Time. Hari Ziyad. Little a, 2021. Hari Ziyad was raised by their Hare Krishna mother and Muslim father in a blended family, growing up in Cleveland with eighteen siblings. Ziyad, who is the editor in chief of RaceBaitr, writes with tender rage about what it means to live beyond imposed narratives of race and gender.

The Breaks: An Essay. Julietta Singh. Coffee House Press and Daunt Books Originals,, 2021. A “messay” (the newly coined Memoir/Essay) disguised as a letter to the author’s daughter that challenges what a queer family can look like without every defining what it must be. Addressing climate change, race, colonialism, identity, and inheritance, Singh asks us how we can choose to move forward through each of these challenging realities, and offers some guidance on how to do so.  

Dear Senthuran: A Black Spirit Memoir. Akwaeke Emezi. Riverhead Books, 2021. In a series of letters addressed to the people in their life, Akwaeke reflects on the various journeys they’ve taken: embracing their identity, navigating the world of publishing, encountering heartbreak, and arriving at a spiritual truth, among other difficult and beautiful experiences. It joins, and shines within, a recent spate of publishing non-traditional and genre-defying narratives centering historically oppressed voices. 

Everybody (Else) Is Perfect: How I survived Hypocrisy, Beauty, Clicks, and Likes. Gabrielle Korn. Atria Books, 2021. A collection of essays touching on the author’s own experience with feminism, sexuality, beauty standards, self-esteem, and other women-centered issues, as the editor-in-chief of Nylon. Though narrow in scope and perspective, many of the points in these essays will resonate with women in similar positions. 

A History of Scars. Laura Lee. Atria Books, 2021. This collection of essays delves into the mind of someone who has schizophrenia. The book names and opens discussions around family history, trauma, and healing. Highly lauded by the likes of Roxane Gay, this belongs on the same shelf as other contemporary illness non-fiction narratives. 

I Never Promised You a Rose Garden. Mannie Murphy. Fantagraphic Books, 2021. In this work of graphic nonfiction that takes the form of an illustrated diary, a nostalgic reminiscence about River Phoenix becomes the thread that Murphy follows deep into the heart of Portland, Oregon’s history of white supremacy. Murphy traces the connections between White Aryan Resistance founder Tom Metzger, filmmaker Gus Van Sant, and the street kids like Ken Death who appeared in Van Sant’s films.

Leaving Isn’t the Hardest Thing. Lauren Hough. Vintage, 2021. A collection of contemporary essays telling about the author’s childhood growing up in a cult;  young adulthood in the military; and adulthood working as a bartender and “cable guy” in and around Washington DC as a butch lesbian. Hough’s work will have you both laughing and near tears from her experiences. At times a peer to Tara Westover’s Educated. 

Like a Boy But Not a Boy: Navigating Life, Mental Health, and Parenthood Outside the Gender Binary. Andrea Bennett. Arsenal Pulp Press, 2020. In a series of essays, Bennett explores the experiences of being a non-binary parent, growing up queer in a small town, and balancing creative work with the necessities of survival. Interspersed throughout is “Everyone is Sober and No One Can Drive,” sixteen biographical sketches based on interviews with other queer Millennials who grew up in small towns in Canada.

The Natural Mother of the Child: A Memoir of Nonbinary Parenthood. Krys Malcolm Belc. Counterpoint LLC, 2021. As a nonbinary, transmasculine parent, giving birth to his son Samson clarified Krys Belc’s gender identity. And yet, when his partner, Anna, adopted Samson, the legal documents listed Belc as “the natural mother of the child.” In interlocking essays, illustrated with legal documents and other official paperback, Belc examines his experiences and his ambivalent relationship with tidy “before” and “after” transition stories.

The Queens’ English: The LGBTQIA+ Dictionary of Lingo and Colloquial Phrases. Chloe O. Davis. Clarkson Potter Publishers, 2021. Do you know what a “bear” is? When did “sickening” start to mean “something amazing”? This comprehensive dictionary provides an in-depth look at queer language, from Sappho to “Ru Paul’s Drag Race.” Full color illustrations and photographs throughout, as well as profiles of the people and events that shaped LGBTQIA+ history and culture.

Sapphic Crossings: Cross-Dressing Women in Eighteenth-Century British Literature. Ula Lukszo Klein. University of Virginia Press, 2021. Details cross-dressing women in various genres,  prompting readers to rethink the roots lesbian and transgender identities. Advances the field of gender and sexuality. Well-documented.

Three Dads and a Baby: Adventures in Modern Parenting. Ian Jenkins. Cleis Press, 2021. The story of a polyamorous throuple (three boyfriends) and their efforts to conceive a baby. A heartfelt adventure. Well-documented with sources.

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June 2015

The following 9 books have been read and recommended for consideration by the final list by at least one juror.

Faderman, Lillian. The Gay Revolution: The Story of the Struggle. New York: Simon & Schuster, 2015.

Green, Allison. The Ghosts Who Travel with Me: A Literary Pilgrimage through Brautigan’s America. Portland, Oregon: Ooligan Press, 2015.

Joyce, Michael. Foucault, in Winter, in the Linnaeus Garden: A Novel. Buffalo, NY: Starcherone Books, 2015.

Lowrey, Sassafras. Lost Boi. Vancouver, BC: Arsenal Pulp Press, 2015.

Nelson, Maggie. The Argonauts. Minneapolis, MN: Graywolf Press, 2015.

Richardson-Self, Louise. Justifying Same-Sex Marriage: A Philosophical Investigation. London ; New York: Rowman & Littlefield, 2015.

Shaw, Adrienne. Gaming at the Edge: Sexuality and Gender at the Margins of Gamer Culture. Minneapolis: University of Minnesota Press, 2014.

Tatonetti, Lisa. The Queerness of Native American Literature. Indigenous Americas. Minneapolis ; London: University of Minnesota Press, 2014.

Zink, Nell. Mislaid. New York: HarperCollins, 2015.

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